Methods for Motivating Employees for Employee Satisfaction


1.Rewards:
People behave in ways that they believe are in their best interest, they constantly look for payoffs for their efforts. They expect good job performance to lead to organizational goal attainment, which in turn leads to satisfying their individual goals or needs. Organization, then, use rewards to motivate people.

Facts [+]

The percentage of employees dissatisfied with their jobs has dropped by 15% in 2017 from 60% in the previous year, reveals the TimesJobs Job Satisfaction survey 2017-18 of over 2,200 working professionals.

A recent Money Magazine and Salary.com survey of 26,000 workers found that workers who considered themselves extremely satisfied with their jobs were putting in a lot more time at work than others. The most satisfied group in the survey reported eleven more weekly work hours than the least satisfied group. Generally, as satisfaction rose, workers reported longer hours worked.


Height of Reward for Motivation 
:
Source: Nov-11-2012 TOI
Jaipur (India): Jaipur traffic police officials decided to motivate a group of eight hardworking police by paying them Rs.11 (0.20$) as a bonus for motivation and appreciation. This has made group to surprise and left them in a state of question of motivation or humiliation for their hardwork done. A police from group of eight who rejected to disclose his name, expressed his extreme dissatisfaction and actually felt humiliated and demotivated. Same of group of eight said that this is not first experience to them, earlier they got cash price of Rs. 51 (1$) for solving serious crimes like recovering stolen vehicle.

Despite of this sort of cash reward, one police official said that amount is not a criteria.

Who ever puts his efforts in discharging his duties and does hard-work  in his job, its human tendency expects some sort of motivation in return, which same was expressed by victor Vroom in his expectancy theory of motivation.


2. Challenging Jobs:
Job design refers to the number and nature of activities in a job. The key issue is whether jobs should be more specialized or more enriched and non-routine. Job design has been implemented in several ways. Job enlargement assigns workers to additional same-level tasks to increase the number of tasks they have to perform. Job rotation systematically moves workers from job to job. Job enrichment means building motivators like opportunities for achievement into the job by making it more interesting and challenging. Forming natural work groups, combining tasks, establishing client relationships, vertically loading the job, and having open feedback channels may implement Job enrichment.

3. Using Merit Pay:

A merit raise is a salary increase, usually permanent, that is based on the employee’s individual performance. It is a continuing increment rather than a single payment like a bonus. Relying heavily on merit rewards can be a problem because the reinforcement benefits of merit pay is usually only determined once per year.


4. Using Spot Awards:

A spot award is one given to an employee as soon as the laudable performance is observed. These awards are consistent with principles of motivation because they are contingent on good performance and are awarded immediately.

5. Using Skill-Based Pay:
With skill-based pay, employees are paid for the range, depth, and types of skills and knowledge they are capable of using rather than for the job they currently hold. Skill based pay is consistent with motivation theory because people have a self-concept in which they seek to fulfill their potential. The system also appeals to the employee’s sense of self-efficacy because the reward is a formal and concrete recognition that the person can do the more challenging job well.

6. Using Recognition:

Some employees highly value day-to-day recognition from their supervisors, peers and team members because it is important for their work to be appreciated by others. Recognition helps satisfy the need people have to achieve and be recognized for their achievement.



"Recognition is like a small drop of oil in the machinery of business. It just makes things run a little smoother."
-– Obert Tanner
Giving recognition makes employees confident in work: Report

Even as receiving recognition is the usual norm, many organisations are now opening channels for employees to give regular recognition to their co-workers and 90 per cent respondents said by doing so they feel more confident in their work, a report has said."Those who give recognition at work are more confident in their work. About 90 per cent of employees who noted that they always give recognition to employees feel that their work in the past 12 months has represented significant innovations," according to a OC Tanner report.

The report also revealed that 94 per cent of employees noted that they always give recognition to co-workers are proud to tell others they work for their organisation.OC Tanner conducted the study among 3,496 employees, who were over 18 years working full-time at companies with more than 500 workforce, in multiple countries across four continents, including the US, the UK, Canada, Australia, India, Singapore and Germany."Creating opportunities for giving, receiving and observing recognition, and devising a programme that focuses on all three, will help organisations increase employee engagement, wellbeing, innovation, work results and revenue," the report said. It said by giving recognition more often, employees not only feel more secure in their present circumstances, but are also more optimistic about their future.

  • The report said that about 89 per cent agree that giving recognition creates a better company culture, while 79 said the giver works harder after they recognise another's achievement.
  • 75 per cent respondents felt that giving recognition makes them want to stay at their current organisation longer.
  • The report said 86 per cent agreed that giving recognition helped them better connect with their colleagues and 81 per cent felt it made them better connect to their organisations.
  • Overall, the report has revealed that employees in the US and the UK give recognition at a higher rate than other countries.
  • Australian, Canadian, and German employees fall in the middle range and while employees in the Asian countries of India and Singapore give recognition the least, it added.
7. Using Job Redesign:
Job design refers to the number and nature of activities in a job. The key issue is whether jobs should be more specialized or more enriched and no routine. Job design has been implemented in several ways. Job enlargement assigns workers to additional same-level tasks to increase the
number of tasks they have to perform. Job rotation systematically moves workers from job to job. Job enrichment means building motivators like opportunities for achievement into the job by making it more interesting and challenging. Job enrichment may be implemented by forming natural work groups, combining tasks, establishing client relationships, vertically loading the job, and having open feedback channels.

8. Using Empowerment:

Empowerment means giving employees the authority, tools, and information they need to do their jobs with greater autonomy, as well as the self-confidence to perform new jobs effectively. Empowerment boosts employees’ feelings of self-efficacy and enables them to use their potential more fully.

9. Using Goal-Setting Methods:
People are strongly motivated to achieve goals they consciously set. Setting goals with employees can be a very effective way of motivating them. Goals should be clear and specific, measurable and verifiable, challenging but realistic, and set with participation.

10. Using Positive Reinforcement:

Positive reinforcement programs rely on operant conditioning principles to supply positive reinforcement and change behavior. Experts claim it is better to focus on improving desirable behaviors rather than on decreasing undesirable ones. There are a variety of consequences including social consequences (e.g., peer approval or praise from the boss), intrinsic consequences (e.g., the enjoyment the person gets from accomplishing challenging tasks), or tangible consequences (e.g., bonuses or merit raises).


11. Using Lifelong Learning:

Lifelong learning can be used to deal with problems of downsizing and employee commitment, and to counterbalance their negative effects. It provides extensive continuing training and education, from basic remedial skills to advanced decision-making techniques, throughout the employees’ careers, which provide employees the opportunity to boost their self-efficacy and self- actualization.

Facts [+]

Presenteeism is the loss of productivity that occurs when workers are present but not performing. Causes of presenteeism include medical issues, personal and family-related issues, and negative workplace perceptions. Presenteeism can be reduced through employee satisfaction assessments, occupational and disability management, employee assistance programs, and work/life programs.